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How to Cut Your Mixed Hair At Home Like A Pro

by victoriavadenking
Published: Last Updated on 3 mins read

Okay — maybe, I should say: how to cut mixed hair with confidence.

If you happened to stumble upon this alluringly entertaining blog post, I’m not a hair professional. What I am is a mom of two curly-haired beautiful girls with 20-something years of experience in maintaining my own curly hair.

Now that we’ve cleared the air…let’s get started.

This post is all about how to cut mixed hair.

If you aren’t subscribed to my channel, I filmed a video straightening my daughter’s hair prior to picking up the scissors. Because I am not a professional, I did not feel comfortable cutting her hair [evenly] while curly.

3 Easy Steps to Cut Girls Hair at Home for Mixed Kids Hair

Let me stress: if you do not feel comfortable cutting your child’s hair: DO NOT CUT YOUR CHILD’S HAIR.

I have seen and heard countless stories of moms who immediately pick up scissors to give their children a trim or baby hair cut, and completely ruin their beautiful hair.

Go to a trained professional who has the patience and experience in mixed curly hair care.

My daughter, Mya has hip-length curly brown hair with natural blonde highlights. To date, I have never put scissors or heat on her mixed hair.

However, as a very active five-year-old with a one-year-old sister who likes to eat hair (yes, I said eat), I assumed there may have been mechanical damage.

Again, I am not a professional, but here are the items I used to cut my daughter’s hair at home: an 8-inch styling comb, a rat-tail comb with a metal (not plastic) end, and hair cutting shears.

Detangle. Detangle. Detangle!

My ultimate goal in how to cut mixed hair for my daughter is solely to take off mechanical damage.

Because of this, I divided Mya’s hair into sections and combed through each section to ensure it was tangle-free. Beginning with no more than an inch or so at the nape of her neck, I combed with the 8-inch comb, followed by the rat tail comb.

In doing so, I was able to keep her hair as taut as possible and clearly see what strands of hair were misaligned. As a newbie, this made it significantly easier to see exactly what I was doing without any bumps or ridges.

After combing each small section with the rat tail comb, I relied on my index and middle fingers to bring the hair strands together to the ends. (This is much easier to explain visually than in text, click here to watch.)

Basically, I gathered each section as taut as possible to assess flyaways (hair strands sticking out), and scraggly hair strands.

As you will see in my YouTube video, Mya did not have straggly ends — but, some sections were more obvious than others and definitely needed to be trimmed.

The rule of thumb I used: the thicker the hair, the less you should see.

Basically, if I could see through the hair strands (or again, if sticking out away from the natural hair shaft), that is what I trimmed off. I kept the process the same, and I felt more confident.

how to cut mixed hair
Cutting my daughter’s mixed curly hair ends (see the flyaways?)

Work slowly and carefully.

Mya’s hair IS a work of art, so I wanted to make sure I was doing everything I could to make it still as beautiful as possible without me messing it up.

Continuing the process section by section, combing through until tangle-free. Then trim off only what is necessary. If any hair strands are sticking out or look scraggly, trim that off for a cohesive look.

Remember work with confidence unless you need the advice and care of a curly hair trained professional. Take your time as you would with your own hair.

Then, add extra precaution to eliminate potential mistakes (especially if your child jerks or leans down to pick up a toy, for example).

When you’re all done, you’ll have conquered a feat that allowed you to bond with your child. In turn, your child will further his or her understanding, appreciation and love for their own mixed hair.

This post was all about how to cut mixed hair at home.

For more mixed hair posts like this, click here. Or follow me on Instagram to keep up with my life as a mom of three mixed-race children and the craziness of marriage and postpartum.

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